Ligação directa ao Robert Fisk e ao pequeno almoço da Morgada, no último dia de Khadafi. Inshalá!

Cruel. Vainglorious. Steeped in blood. And now, surely, after more than four decades of terror and oppression, on his way out?

A revolução continua em directo no Live Stream da Al Jazeera.
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3 respostas a Ligação directa ao Robert Fisk e ao pequeno almoço da Morgada, no último dia de Khadafi. Inshalá!

  1. Leo diz:

    Reparem como está em curso a fabricação duma nova intervenção “humanitária”. O que querem? Para começar que a NATO (por intermédio da NATO) imponha uma no fly-zone na Líbia. Eis parte do road map da CNN:

    Across the Middle East and North Africa, CNN’s reporters and iReporters are covering protests
    Developments on unrest in the Middle East and North Africa:

    LIBYA 11:45 p.m. ET, 6:45 a.m. local: U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called on Libya to immediately stop the “unacceptable” attacks on anti-government demonstrators. “Like you and many others around the world, I have seen very disturbing and shocking scenes, where Libyan authorities have been firing at demonstrators from warplanes and helicopters,” Ban said from Los Angeles. “This is unacceptable. This must stop immediately. This is a serious violation of international humanitarian law.”

    LIBYA, 11:22 p.m. ET, 6:22 a.m. local: At the request of Libya’s deputy ambassador to the United Nations – who earlier today called the crackdown in Libya a “genocide” – the U.N. Security Council scheduled a Tuesday morning meeting on Libya. This will be the first time the council has held consultations over any of the revolts that have swept Arab nations since January.

    LIBYA, 11:09 p.m. ET, 6:09 a.m. local: A Libyan woman, speaking on condition of anonymity to CNN’s Anderson Cooper, recounts a massacre near her home in Tripoli:

    LIBYA, 7:40 p.m. ET, 2:40 a.m. local: About 15,000 of Libya’s 2 million to 3 million Egyptians returned Monday across the border, border officials said. The Egyptian military has set up refugee camps near its border with Libya and set up two mobile hospitals at the Salloum border crossing to assist Egyptians fleeing the protests in Libya, Egypt’s state-run news website EgyNews reported late Monday.

    LIBYA, 7:33 p.m. ET, 2:33 a.m. local: Here is more on Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s 40-second appearance – in which he said he still was in Libya – on state-run TV Tuesday morning:
    “I want to have some rest,” the embattled Libyan leader told a reporter in front of what Libyan television said was his house as he pulled out an umbrella in the rain. “Because I was talking to the young man at Green Square, and I want to stay the night with them but then it started raining. I want to show them that I am in Tripoli, not in Venezuela. Don’t believe those dogs in the media.” Green Square is where pro-government demonstrators in Tripoli have been located.

    LIBYA, 6:49 p.m. ET, 1:49 a.m. local: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi said Tuesday morning on state-run television that he is not in Venezuela as rumored, but in Tripoli.

    LIBYA, 6:46 p.m. ET, 1:46 a.m. local: CNN’s Cairo bureau chief Ben Wedeman has entered eastern Libya and is the first western television reporter to enter and report from inside Libya during the current crisis. He says much of eastern Libya appears to be in opposition control. “What we saw as we were driving in is that this part of eastern Libya is clearly under the controls of the rebels – the forces that are opposed to Col. Gadhafi,” Wedeman by phone on CNN’s “The Situation Room.” “We saw along the road a lot of groups of men with shotguns – with machine guns – in civilian clothing. They call themselves basically the popular committees that are trying to maintain some sort of order along the way. “Clearly the situation is very unstable. What we saw was that there are a lot of people – mostly Egyptians – who are leaving Libya at the moment. At the Egyptian border we were told by Egyptian officials that 15,000 Egyptian s left Libya, returning to Egypt.” “There are some signs of normal life. Gas stations are open. Stores are open. We saw … what looked like kebab shops that are functioning. There is a fair amount of traffic on the road, although I was told that was mostly Egyptians leaving the country.”

    LIBYA, 6:35 p.m. ET, 1:35 a.m. local: Libyan state TV is reporting that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is to speak soon.

    LIBYA, 6:28 p.m. ET, 1:28 a.m. local: Ali Al Oujli, Libya’s ambassador to the United States, said earlier today that he urges protesters in Libya “to keep momentum alive.” “If they they keep the momentum in the Libyan streets, (then) they’ll reach their goals. … They have a very good experience on what happening in Egypt and what happening in Tunisia. And they should not compromise.”

    LIBYA, 6:22 p.m. ET, 1:22 a.m. local: Earlier today, this blog reported that Ibrahim Dabbashi, Libya’s deputy ambassador to the United Nations, told reporters Monday that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi has declared war on the Libyan people and is committing genocide. Dabbashi was speaking in reference to reports that the Libyan military was firing on protesters.

    LIBYA, 6:07 p.m. ET, 1:07 a.m. local: A formerly pro-government newspaper in Libya is reporting that African mercenaries are shooting at unarmed civilians in Tajouraa, 25 miles east of Tripoli. The newspaper Quryna’s perspective has changed since protests in Libya began.
    CNN could not immediately confirm the report. The Libyan government maintains tight control on communications and has not responded to repeated requests from CNN for access to the country.

    LIBYA, 5:32 p.m. ET, 12:32 a.m. local: The United States on Monday condemned the violence in Libya and called for a halt to the “unacceptable bloodshed” in response to civil unrest, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said in a statement.
    “The government of Libya has a responsibility to respect the universal rights of the people, including the right to free expression and assembly,” Clinton’s statement said.

    LIBYA, 5:29 p.m. ET, 12:29 a.m. local: Saif al-Islam al-Gadhafi, the son of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, told the Libyan state news agency that the Libyan armed forces have not targeted protesters in Tripoli and Benghazi, Libyan state television reported Monday.
    Al-Gadhafi said the bombardments targeted ammunition storage facilities in remote areas.
    Earlier, a U.S. official not authorized to speak publicly told CNN that Libya has used “aviation assets” to attack protesters on the outskirts of Tripoli.
    In the following video, CNN’s Ivan Watson, reporting from Egypt, talks about these allegations that Libya used aviation assets to attack protesters.

    LIBYA, 5:21 p.m. ET, 12:21 a.m. local: Libya has used “aviation assets” to attack protesters on the outskirts of Tripoli, a U.S. official not authorized to speak publicly told CNN Monday.
    The official could not be more specific about the “assets,” but the National Front for the Salvation of Libya, an opposition group, said helicopter gunships have fired into crowds of protesters.
    A Libyan diplomatic source has denied the Libyan air force was conducting air raids against protesters in Libya.

    LIBYA, 4:54 p.m. ET, 11:54 p.m. local: Video on YouTube shows what CNN is told are six badly burned bodies of Libyan soldiers in open body bags. Opposition sources in Libya say the bodies are of soldiers who refused to shoot at anti-government demonstrators. The video, taken on a cell phone, was posted on Monday; it is not known when it was taken.

    LIBYA, 4:31 p.m. ET, 11:31 p.m. local: A woman in Tripoli, speaking on condition of anonymity, reports seeing people shooting – in an apparently random fashion – from cars. “I’ve seen myself red Hyundai cars with tinted windows that had armed people inside it shooting random people,” she told CNN in a telephone interview. “Three victims have fallen in the street where I live.”
    CNN could not independently confirm this report. The Libyan government maintains tight control on communications and has not responded to repeated requests from CNN for access to the country. CNN has interviewed numerous witnesses by phone.

    LIBYA, 4:25 p.m. ET, 11:25 p.m. local: A Libyan diplomatic source has denied the Libyan air force was conducting air raids against protesters in Libya. Earlier, the National Front for the Salvation of Libya, an opposition group, said helicopter gunships were firing into crowds.

    LIBYA, 4:01 p.m. ET, 11:01 p.m. local: The Arab League will hold an urgent summit Tuesday to discuss the recent developments in Libya, Egypt’s official news agency MENA reported Monday.

    LIBYA, 3:41 p.m. ET, 10:41 p.m. local: CNN is checking reports that helicopters in Libya fired on protesters. The National Front for the Salvation of Libya, an opposition group, has said helicopter gunships were firing into crowds.

    LIBYA, 3:29 p.m. ET, 10:29 p.m. local: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi still is in Libya, a Libyan diplomatic source told CNN. The source also denied the Libyan air force was conducting air raids against protesters in Libya.
    Separately, a senior official in the Italian secret service also said that Gadhafi remains in Libya. Earlier today, British Foreign Secretary William Hague told Reuters that Libyan leader Gadhafi may have been on his way to Venezuela.

    LIBYA, 2:15 p.m. ET, 9:15 p.m. local: Two Libyan Air Force pilots defected to Malta on Monday after being asked to bomb Libyan citizens, a Maltese government source said. The pilots’ fighter jets were armed with rockets and loaded machine guns, the source said. Malta is a short flight from Libya.

    LIBYA, 2:04 p.m. ET, 11:04 p.m. local: Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi Mahmudi met in Tripoli with ambassadors of the European Union, blaming the unrest in the country on “terrorists and destructive plans” and stressing that Libya has the right to “take any measures” to protect its unity, stability, people and resources, Libyan state television reported.

    LIBYA, 1:19 p.m. ET, 8:19 p.m. local: Libyan helicopter gunships are firing into crowds of protesters, according to the National Front for the Salvation of Libya, an opposition group. CNN was unable to confirm the report independently.

    LIBYA, 12:45 p.m. ET, 7:45 p.m. local: Oil company Total says it will evacuate most of its expatriate employees and their families from Libya. Shell said it has temporarily relocated the families of expatriate staff.

    LIBYA, 12:30 p.m. ET, 7:30 p.m. local: The U.S. State Department has ordered family members of U.S. Embassy employees and non-emergency personnel to leave Libya.

    LIBYA, 12:26 p.m. ET, 7:26 p.m. local: Ibrahim Dabbashi, Libya’s deputy ambassador to the United Nations, told reporters that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi has declared war on the Libyan people and is committing genocide.

    LIBYA, 12:02 ET, 7:02 p.m. local: British Foreign Secretary William Hague told Reuters that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi may be on his way to Venezuela. The Libyan ambassador to the UK, Omar Jelban, is denying that Gadhafi is on his way to Venezuela.

    LIBYA, noon ET, 7 p.m. local: U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon had talked with Gadhafi, saying he was deeply concern about the violence, and that it must stop. At least 233 people have been killed in the protests, according to Human Rights Watch. Its report cites information from hospital sources. CNN is not able to independently confirm the figure, as the network has not been granted access to report on the ground.

    LIBYA, 11:45 a.m. ET, 6:45 p.m. local The government is demanding that citizens cooperate with security forces, and warning “organized gangs,” Libyan state television reported, as security forces conduct raids on what it called “nests of terror and sabotage.” Libya’s justice minister, Mustafa Abdul Jalil, has resigned to protest the “bloody situation and use of excessive force” against protesters by security forces, a Libyan newspaper reported. Meanwhile, two Libyan fighter jets have landed in Malta, according to journalists at the airport.

    LIBYA, 11 a.m. ET, 6 p.m. local: As reports streamed of protesters setting fire to a government building in Libya’s capital and ransacking state TV headquarters, questions swirled around Gadhafi and whether he could be the third Arab leader toppled by the wave of protests rippling through the region. His son, Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, is trying to defend the family dynasty, warning on state television of “a fierce civil war” if the demonstrations don’t halt.

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/02/21/live-blogging-north-africa-middle-east-protests/

  2. Leo diz:

    Correcção:

    Reparem como está em curso a fabricação duma nova intervenção “humanitária”. O que querem? Para começar que o Conselho de Segurança da ONU (por intermédio da NATO) imponha uma no fly-zone na Líbia. Eis parte do road map da CNN:

  3. Vai ser o meu jantar, aliás ceia. És um gajo das arábias, obrigada!

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